Google Fiber

A recent bit of technology buzz that I have been keeping my eye on is Google’s new high-speed broadband network Google Fiber. For some time now, Google has been branching out from it’s search engine roots. We can now enjoy exploring the internet through the Chrome browser, buying music, movies, and apps through Google Play, tote around sleek Chrome netbooks, and complete our projects online with Google Drive. However, it looks like now not only does Google want to provide you with great tools to interact with the web, but they also want to provide you with the internet itself.

Google Fiber is the company’s solution to high internet and cable costs, as well as slow speeds. For a one time $300 installation fee, Google will provide free basic internet at 5Mbps for at least 7 years. Should you be interested in the the high-speed gigabit Internet, you can waive the fee and pay $70/month. Finally, if you want the full package (Internet and TV) you can pay $120/month, without a startup fee.

So what exactly is so great about Google Fiber? Why should we bother caring about this particular network provider? Well, according to the Google Fiber website, the big difference is speed. Clocking in at 1000 Mb per second, Google boasts that their network can run 100 times faster than the current average internet. Of course if you are drawn more to the TV side of things, Google offers 2 terabytes of cloud storage for recording up to 8 programs simultaneously.

This all sounds pretty amazing, so what’s the catch? As it stands, Google Fiber services are limited to Kansas and Missouri. Recent expansion plans have them heading toward Texas, but for most of us it seems we will be stuck without for a while. Even so, the potential of technology like this is amazing to think about. Faster internet means faster searches, faster results, delay free video conferencing, lightning fast online games, and plenty of broadband for everyone to get their work done.

–LS

 

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